Leading at CNU

I’ve found that groups and organizations around CNU are always looking for people to take leadership positions. In fraternities, singing groups, volunteer organizations, and sports teams, leaders are always valuable and desirable. I feel lucky to have become deeply involved in various organizations. In my commitment to these organizations I feel a closer connection to my fellow members and the CNU campus.

I am currently fulfilling my final requirements for CNU’s Leadership Minor. Through the classes I have taken in the subject, I have been challenged to look at organizations and groups through the lens of leadership. This doesn’t just involve watching the president of every organization, this involves focusing yourself to push the organization to be better regardless of the position you are in.

In Phi Alpha Delta (the Pre-Law Fraternity), Trebled Youth (an A Capella group) and even in CHECs (the student judicial appeal) I have seen some of my peers step up to take positions when there is a need for them. In high school it was always frustrating to see individuals pursue leadership positions for the glory or the resume-fodder. At CNU I have seen responsible people take on leadership positions when they see a need, and they feel that they can do the best job. It is for this reason that many of CNU’s clubs and activities are very well-run.

The most visible way that this leadership maturity can be seen is in students’ willingness to take positions like secretary, and treasurer in a group and still deliver their 100% even if the position does not offer them bragging rights. I have seen students defer greater leadership positions that they want to other people that they think can do a better job because they want what is best for the organization.

If you have members of student groups and organizations that care as much about the group as the president of the organization then you have a highly effective group. CNU is filled with these organizations. If you take your time to find a group that follows the same passions that you do, you will find that you become a leader in the group in no time at all.

Advertisements

CNU Snow

On the 25th of January it snowed at CNU. Being from Maine, I can tell you that the white fluffy stuff doesn’t exactly thrill me when it falls and covers the ground like the coldest of blankets, but since it’s such a rarity in Newport News, people go nuts. I swear, when people around here see a snowflake it’s like it’s Apocalypse 2012 all over again (In other words, everyone posts Facebook statuses about it for a while until the novelty runs out).

Around the city cars drive more slowly and cautiously (for good reason). Many cars lack snow tires and the drivers know that their 0-60 is far less important than 60-0. Businesses shut down in the area, and some students get their classes canceled (but don’t always count on it). Everyone walks a bit more briskly and the smokers even try quitting for a couple days because they can’t stand the cold. You’ll often see kids traveling in packs, walking close together to conserve heat like penguins in Antarctica.

snow4

That said; snow on the CNU campus is beautiful. When it’s falling outside you could curl up with a cup of hot chocolate in Einstein’s or if you live in York East or West you can utilize those fancy fireplaces in the lobby. The fountain freezes over and the basketball court disappears, the roofs of the academic buildings are white and the campus is quiet because everyone is staying indoors as much as possible. In between classes, after a thick snow has fallen, the campus is peaceful and still. If you look over the Great Lawn you might not be able to tell that within the buildings are thousands of young excited people bursting with the energy and drive to be the best that they can be. I often think that if there is a metaphorical winter the world faces today, it will be the likes of CNU students that will bring the spring.

…And We’re Back

There’s a big difference between January in Maine and January in Newport News, Virginia. As winter winds whipped over the rocky coast of New England, I spent my Christmas Break sleeping in, working now and then, and relaxing by the fire reading “Game of Thrones”.  I soaked in the relaxation while I could. I knew that when I got back to CNU, things were going to get tough fast.

I was right.

In the first full week of classes I turned in 3 papers, 3 page-long assignments, and I took two quizzes. The next week I have 4 papers due and at least one quiz to take. At the same time I have volunteering to do, work, and practice. If it sounds like a lot, I can assure you that it is.

As with each semester at CNU, the professors have high expectations of their students. My business professor is all about ensuring we get as much out of each class as possible, already she starts class a couple minutes early and goes until the very last minute, trying to give us as much information as possible while we’re there.

Over break I knew that I would return to late nights and early mornings. I didn’t think of it with dread or apprehension, on the contrary; I was excited to transition back to the intensity of academic challenge. By your sixth semester at CNU you know that you will get what you put in to the semester, give it your all and you’ll end the semester proud.

You’ll find everyone feels about the same when it comes to the beginning of the semester. You pass a buddy who was in your Honors class and ask him, “How’s your semester shaping up?” He’ll respond: “It’s going to be crazy. I’m going to be so busy.” You ask him, “you pumped?” to which he responds, “yup!”

In the eternal words of the Black Eyed Peas, “Let’s get it started.”

Image

 

Sorry.